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Organizational Change
Valentino Trumps Louis Vuitton in Greenpeace Fashion Rankings

Greenpeace Italy released a new green ranking guide revealing major discrepancies between fifteen high-profile fashion brands on toxic water pollution and deforestation.

Greenpeace Italy released a new green ranking guide revealing major discrepancies between fifteen high-profile fashion brands on toxic water pollution and deforestation.

Valentino received the highest marks for improving sustainability in its global supply chain while six brands, including Louis Vuitton, came in last for failing to take any credible action on environmental issues. The Greenpeace campaign, Fashion Duel, rates Italian and French luxury brands based on a survey of three areas of the brands’ global supply chains: leather, pulp and paper and toxic water pollution.

“Brands at the bottom of the rank, such as Louis Vuitton are global fashion trendsetters, but they also now have an opportunity to become environmental leaders,” said Chiara Campione, of Greenpeace Italy. “They must take urgent and transparent action to eliminate the release of hazardous chemicals throughout their supply chain and products and put in place concrete measures to avoid contamination of their supply chain from forest destruction.”

Valentino already has promised to eliminate hazardous chemicals in its products and to achieve zero deforestation. Other labels have been less forthcoming; Dolce & Gabbana, Chanel, Hermès, Prada, Alberta Ferretti and Trussardi refused to disclose information for the survey.

The textile industry is one of the biggest global contributors to toxic water pollution, especially in countries such as China and Mexico. Greenpeace investigations have revealed major sustainability problems afflicting the industry. Facilities regularly release hazardous and hormone-disrupting substances into water supplies and large areas of the Amazon rainforest have been destroyed to make way for cattle, used in the production of shoes, bags and belts.

Earlier this month the Forest Footprint Disclosure Report showed several brands are beginning to disclose information regarding forest impacts, although the gap between leading companies and laggards is growing.

@Bart_King is a freelance writer and communications consultant. @mikehower contributed.

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