Behavior Change
Greenpeace Targeting 'Little Monsters' in Luxury Brands at Milan Fashion Week

Greenpeace certainly is on a roll, counting two major successes in as many weeks with commitments from fashion brand Burberry and retailer Primark to eliminate toxic chemicals from all of their products and production processes by 2020. Now the NGO is riding the wave of momentum generated by its global Detox campaign and “Little Monsters” report to Milan fashion week, where it has called out luxury brands including Versace, Louis Vuitton and Dolce & Gabbana for using the same hazardous chemicals used in the manufacturing of fast fashion to produce children’s clothes.

On Wednesday in Milan, Greenpeace protesters hung a 100-square-meter banner from the ceiling of the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele featuring model Eugenia Volodina and a young ‘King’ who is taking a stand against toxic fashion. The banner reads: “Beautiful fashion, ugly lies? #TheKingisNaked.” And below, volunteers opened a second banner insisting that "Versace detox now!"

For the report, 27 products from eight luxury fashion brands were tested. 16 of the products tested positive for one or more of the following chemicals: nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEs), phthalates, per- or polyfluorinated chemicals, and antimony. According to the analysis, the highest concentration of NPEs was detected in a Louis Vuitton-branded ballerina shoe while the highest concentration of PFCs were reportedly found in a Versace jacket. Some of these chemicals, when leached into the environment from factories and the clothes themselves, can accumulate in the world’s waterways and have hormone-disrupting qualities.

“It’s time these luxury brands lived up to their reputation as fashion trendsetters, and started leading the toxic-free fashion revolution," said Chiara Campione, Fashion Duel project leader with Greenpeace Italy. "By committing to Detox their supply chains, brands like Valentino and Burberry have shown that beautiful fashion doesn’t have to cost the earth. What are toxic addicts like Versace, Louis Vuitton, Dior or Dolce & Gabbana waiting for?”

Brands, using their power for good ...

As more and more brands are working to steer consumers into more sustainable behaviors and lifestyles, hear from Etienne White, VP of SB's Brands for Good initiative, the latest insights on driving that behavior change and measuring the impacts — at New Metrics '19, November 18-20.

Advertisement

More Stories

Have Sustainable Brands delivered right to your inbox.
We offer free, twice weekly newsletters designed to help you create and maintain your company's competitive edge by adopting smarter, more sustainable business strategies and practices.
Copyright ©2007-2019 Sustainable Life Media, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Sustainable Brands® is a registered trademark of Sustainable Life Media, Inc.